MINT Magazine
Stanford Fashion & Culture
 As described by Kinjal Vasavada, Head Curator at Stanford UNICEF:  “The Importance of Being Lost”  Photograph by Eva Hoffman  Oh, the Places You’ll Go! by Dr. Seuss is a lens through which many of us have thought about the ups and downs of being a kid and growing up, in a culture that values rugged individualism and achievement. The concept of childhood varies among cultures and nations, resulting in a diverse array of experiences that fall under the umbrella term “childhood.” While photographs of children are often used to universalize childhood, they can be used as a powerful tool to do precisely the opposite: expose viewers to the vastly different perspectives with which people think about childhood. In this exhibit, we juxtaposed the distinct experiences of children from more than ten nations across the globe with the classic narrative of Dr. Seuss’s Oh, the Places You’ll Go! We invite you to explore the nuances in each phase of the story arc and share your thoughts and feelings.  cont. from previous page. In a world that has become inundated by technology and the media, kids have begun to lose their sense of wonder and fascination concerning nature. The parents of this young boy (pictured) decided to tackle this problem in a unique way. They got rid of their TV and instead promoted time for self-reflection as well as to discover a sense of exploration and wonder with nature. Eva Hoffman is a freshman at Stanford University planning on studying Product Design or Marine Biology. She grew up in Minnesota with her family, her dog, 6 chickens and 80,000 bees. She has been interested in photography for several years and was a finalist for a national geographic student photo competition in 2012 and a two-time Minnesota High School Press Association winner for her photographs.

OH! The Places You'll Go

Photographic Reflections on Childhood Across Cultures

WHEN: January 13-15, 2017

WHERE: Roble Arts Gym, Stanford, California

WHAT: Stanford student artists contributed their artwork to Stanford UNICEF’s first-ever art exhibit, sponsored by Stanford Arts. Over 100 visitors came to the exhibit organized by the UNICEF Winter Arts Exhibit Team.

 As described by Kinjal Vasavada, Head Curator at Stanford UNICEF:  “The Importance of Being Lost”  Photograph by Eva Hoffman  Oh, the Places You’ll Go! by Dr. Seuss is a lens through which many of us have thought about the ups and downs of being a kid and growing up, in a culture that values rugged individualism and achievement. The concept of childhood varies among cultures and nations, resulting in a diverse array of experiences that fall under the umbrella term “childhood.” While photographs of children are often used to universalize childhood, they can be used as a powerful tool to do precisely the opposite: expose viewers to the vastly different perspectives with which people think about childhood. In this exhibit, we juxtaposed the distinct experiences of children from more than ten nations across the globe with the classic narrative of Dr. Seuss’s Oh, the Places You’ll Go! We invite you to explore the nuances in each phase of the story arc and share your thoughts and feelings.  cont. from previous page. In a world that has become inundated by technology and the media, kids have begun to lose their sense of wonder and fascination concerning nature. The parents of this young boy (pictured) decided to tackle this problem in a unique way. They got rid of their TV and instead promoted time for self-reflection as well as to discover a sense of exploration and wonder with nature. Eva Hoffman is a freshman at Stanford University planning on studying Product Design or Marine Biology. She grew up in Minnesota with her family, her dog, 6 chickens and 80,000 bees. She has been interested in photography for several years and was a finalist for a national geographic student photo competition in 2012 and a two-time Minnesota High School Press Association winner for her photographs.

As described by Kinjal Vasavada, Head Curator at Stanford UNICEF:

“The Importance of Being Lost”

Photograph by Eva Hoffman

Oh, the Places You’ll Go! by Dr. Seuss is a lens through which many of us have thought about the ups and downs of being a kid and growing up, in a culture that values rugged individualism and achievement. The concept of childhood varies among cultures and nations, resulting in a diverse array of experiences that fall under the umbrella term “childhood.” While photographs of children are often used to universalize childhood, they can be used as a powerful tool to do precisely the opposite: expose viewers to the vastly different perspectives with which people think about childhood. In this exhibit, we juxtaposed the distinct experiences of children from more than ten nations across the globe with the classic narrative of Dr. Seuss’s Oh, the Places You’ll Go! We invite you to explore the nuances in each phase of the story arc and share your thoughts and feelings.

cont. from previous page. In a world that has become inundated by technology and the media, kids have begun to lose their sense of wonder and fascination concerning nature. The parents of this young boy (pictured) decided to tackle this problem in a unique way. They got rid of their TV and instead promoted time for self-reflection as well as to discover a sense of exploration and wonder with nature. Eva Hoffman is a freshman at Stanford University planning on studying Product Design or Marine Biology. She grew up in Minnesota with her family, her dog, 6 chickens and 80,000 bees. She has been interested in photography for several years and was a finalist for a national geographic student photo competition in 2012 and a two-time Minnesota High School Press Association winner for her photographs.

 “Look Behind” Photograph by Megha Srivastava  A young Bhutanese girl looks at my camera as she is led by her family to the central prayer area of the Changangkha Lhakhang temple in Thimphu. This temple is a popular place for parents to get blessing for their children by the protector deity, Tamdrin. Megha Srivastava is a junior majoring in Computer Science, and have always enjoyed photography as a bridge between engineering techniques and art. I love learning about different cultures, especially through their religious customs and traditions, and got the chance to immerse myself in Indian and Bhutanese culture in the summer of 2016. My work showcased in this exhibition all feature children near religious places of worship, examining the way children interact with the religious cultures of India and Bhutan.

“Look Behind” Photograph by Megha Srivastava

A young Bhutanese girl looks at my camera as she is led by her family to the central prayer area of the Changangkha Lhakhang temple in Thimphu. This temple is a popular place for parents to get blessing for their children by the protector deity, Tamdrin. Megha Srivastava is a junior majoring in Computer Science, and have always enjoyed photography as a bridge between engineering techniques and art. I love learning about different cultures, especially through their religious customs and traditions, and got the chance to immerse myself in Indian and Bhutanese culture in the summer of 2016. My work showcased in this exhibition all feature children near religious places of worship, examining the way children interact with the religious cultures of India and Bhutan.

 “My Shadow” Photograph  by Raghav Mehrotra  A young girl peers through the grills of a food store in Timbavati Village. Poverty and the resulting food scarcity are detrimental to childrens’ development in this South African village.” Raghav Mehrotra is currently a Junior at Stanford, studying South Asian History and Computer Science. He is interested in the intersection of technology and education, particularly in developing economies. Inspired by the power of photojournalism as a visual literacy tool, he hopes to pursue his passion for photography to highlight the scope for improvement in current educational paradigms in the Indian subcontinent.

“My Shadow” Photograph

by Raghav Mehrotra

A young girl peers through the grills of a food store in Timbavati Village. Poverty and the resulting food scarcity are detrimental to childrens’ development in this South African village.” Raghav Mehrotra is currently a Junior at Stanford, studying South Asian History and Computer Science. He is interested in the intersection of technology and education, particularly in developing economies. Inspired by the power of photojournalism as a visual literacy tool, he hopes to pursue his passion for photography to highlight the scope for improvement in current educational paradigms in the Indian subcontinent.

 “Lost in Between: Yazidi Kurdish Refugee child, Shingal Mountain, Kurdistan”  Photograph by Alan Khaledi  This photo is taken in Shingal Mountain. The Yazidis after having Shingal (their main town) and some of the surrounding villages invaded had to escape ISIS. The Shingal mountain is a huge mountain range that was besieged by ISIS on all sides. Being familiar with the terrain and geography, small groups of armed men within them were able to protect them for a period of few weeks without any water or supplies, where some lost their families to starvation and dehydration. After the Kurdish Peshmerga was able to break and save them, they refused to stay within camp parameters and have chosen to live in the mountain, close to their home. They are a firm believer that this is temporary and that they want their home back. I talked to this girl’s older brother, and I got this shot as she was creeping through the door and listening to us. Her story and that of his brother were similar to many of the other children – vague memory of the brutality their family witnessed, a list of names of the people they had lost in their family and relatives, and a existing in a state of abyss in their current state of living. A lot of the children I met were very little at the time of the attacks, and some have been born in the mountain. Let your imagination depict what it’s like being born into this world without a home and your closest family members.

“Lost in Between: Yazidi Kurdish Refugee child, Shingal Mountain, Kurdistan”

Photograph by Alan Khaledi

This photo is taken in Shingal Mountain. The Yazidis after having Shingal (their main town) and some of the surrounding villages invaded had to escape ISIS. The Shingal mountain is a huge mountain range that was besieged by ISIS on all sides. Being familiar with the terrain and geography, small groups of armed men within them were able to protect them for a period of few weeks without any water or supplies, where some lost their families to starvation and dehydration. After the Kurdish Peshmerga was able to break and save them, they refused to stay within camp parameters and have chosen to live in the mountain, close to their home. They are a firm believer that this is temporary and that they want their home back. I talked to this girl’s older brother, and I got this shot as she was creeping through the door and listening to us. Her story and that of his brother were similar to many of the other children – vague memory of the brutality their family witnessed, a list of names of the people they had lost in their family and relatives, and a existing in a state of abyss in their current state of living. A lot of the children I met were very little at the time of the attacks, and some have been born in the mountain. Let your imagination depict what it’s like being born into this world without a home and your closest family members.

 “Meet our new front yard: Yazidi Kurdish refugee child, Shingal Mountain, Kurdistan”  Photograph by Alan Khaledi  A child I ran into in the blazing sun mopping the dirt off the ground as entertainment. Without any means of schooling, electricity and minimal water, it is hard to imagine how a single day will pass. Alan Khaledi is a photographer born in Erbil, the capital of Kurdistan – an autonomous region in Northern Iraq. Currently pursuing Electronics Engineering in his final year at Stanford, Alan is inspired by the power of documenting and sharing stories across visual media, both through photography and film projects. Alan is committed to using his work towards issues related to environment conservation and human rights, as well as documenting diminishing cultures and marginalized people.

“Meet our new front yard: Yazidi Kurdish refugee child, Shingal Mountain, Kurdistan”

Photograph by Alan Khaledi

A child I ran into in the blazing sun mopping the dirt off the ground as entertainment. Without any means of schooling, electricity and minimal water, it is hard to imagine how a single day will pass. Alan Khaledi is a photographer born in Erbil, the capital of Kurdistan – an autonomous region in Northern Iraq. Currently pursuing Electronics Engineering in his final year at Stanford, Alan is inspired by the power of documenting and sharing stories across visual media, both through photography and film projects. Alan is committed to using his work towards issues related to environment conservation and human rights, as well as documenting diminishing cultures and marginalized people.

 “Happy for Now”  Photograph by Ameeqa Ali  I was walking past a group of children, taking a couple of pictures, when this young girl stepped out in front of me and started dancing. She quickly drew in a crowd with her bright smile and vibrant dance moves. She was so very happy in the moment, despite many of the hardships children face, growing up in Dhaka, Bangladesh Ameeqa Ali is a senior at Stanford, on her way to receiving a BS in Symbolic Systems and an MS in Management Sciences & Engineering. Growing up in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and traveling often, Ameeqa was constantly capturing images of those around her. In high school she started her own photography business and worked for a magazine. She is the Founder and EIC of PULSE Magazine at Stanford University.

“Happy for Now”

Photograph by Ameeqa Ali

I was walking past a group of children, taking a couple of pictures, when this young girl stepped out in front of me and started dancing. She quickly drew in a crowd with her bright smile and vibrant dance moves. She was so very happy in the moment, despite many of the hardships children face, growing up in Dhaka, Bangladesh Ameeqa Ali is a senior at Stanford, on her way to receiving a BS in Symbolic Systems and an MS in Management Sciences & Engineering. Growing up in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and traveling often, Ameeqa was constantly capturing images of those around her. In high school she started her own photography business and worked for a magazine. She is the Founder and EIC of PULSE Magazine at Stanford University.

 “Sand Dollar Beach, Big Sur, California”  Photograph by Kristen Stipanov  Children enjoy a sunny summer day boogie boarding at Big Sur’s largest beach, Sand Dollar Beach. Kristen Stipanov developed a passion for photography as she began playing with her grandfather’s film cameras in high school. At Stanford, Kristen taught herself digital photography and started trying photojournalism. She eventually ran the photo section of The Stanford Daily, interned with the photo editors of Smithsonian Magazine and as a photographer at The Monterey County Weekly. This photograph was taken on a detour from a Monterey County Weekly assignment. In her photography, she is especially interested in the line between documentation and art.

“Sand Dollar Beach, Big Sur, California”

Photograph by Kristen Stipanov

Children enjoy a sunny summer day boogie boarding at Big Sur’s largest beach, Sand Dollar Beach. Kristen Stipanov developed a passion for photography as she began playing with her grandfather’s film cameras in high school. At Stanford, Kristen taught herself digital photography and started trying photojournalism. She eventually ran the photo section of The Stanford Daily, interned with the photo editors of Smithsonian Magazine and as a photographer at The Monterey County Weekly. This photograph was taken on a detour from a Monterey County Weekly assignment. In her photography, she is especially interested in the line between documentation and art.